Do I have Autism Test (Free Adult Quiz)

In recent years, research has come out suggesting that autism has been underdiagnosed in children and adults. Signs of autism may be overlooked, or parents fail to pursue a diagnosis due to stigmas surrounding the developmental disorder. As time goes on and conversations around autism are more open, people are realizing that “quirks” they have had are actually signs of autism spectrum disorder. 

This test is not meant to be a diagnosis of autism, but it may shed a light on how your behavior compares to those who have received a diagnosis. If these behaviors are negatively impacting your life, there are options for you to receive a diagnosis and seek out accommodations at work, school, or at home. With more acceptance and understanding surrounding autism, we are able to create more inclusive spaces and make sure every person can enjoy their lives. 

What Is Autism? 

Autism is a developmental disorder that impacts the nervous system. It is also known as autism spectrum disorder, as it exists on a wide spectrum and impacts each individual differently. Some people with autism may be completely nonverbal, while others may just have difficulties socializing. 

Most parents notice the signs of autism in children before they enter school. Developmental delays that indicate autism include repetitive moments, lack of eye contact, or intense reactions when their routine is disrupted. Around 1 in 44 children are “on the spectrum.” 

Although a lot of discussion surrounding autism focuses on children, children do not “grow out” of autism. Autistic adults can live fairly “normal” and productive lives depending on the severity of the disorders and available accommodations. This is why inclusivity from non-autistic people is so important – it creates environments where everyone can thrive. 

Do I Have Aspergers? Why The Term Is No Longer Used. 

In addition to an autism diagnosis, a person once may have been told that they have Asperger’s Disorder. The diagnosis was given to people who experience less severe symptoms of autism. However, this term is rarely used by those in the autistic community. Hans Asperger, for whom the disorder was named, was tied to Nazis. During World War II, Nazi scientists conducted experiments and studies on children with disorders with the intention of eliminating them. At one clinic alone, 800 children with disabilities or neurodivergence were murdered. 

People within the autistic community have rejected using Asperger’s name and instead see autism as a group of multiple developmental disorders. 

How To Know If You’re Autistic 

An autism diagnosis can bring clarity to people who might have gone through their whole lives feeling different or inadequate. When some people receive a diagnosis, they feel as though many things “now make sense.” Will an autism diagnosis bring clarity to your life? First, you will need to see if you are on the autism spectrum. 

This test can help you gauge whether certain behaviors are similar to those who are on the autism spectrum. Your results are not a diagnosis. No one can diagnose themselves with autism. If you believe that you might be autistic, you should reach out to a mental health professional that can evaluate you with proper tools and is certified to diagnose people.

Know that, even though your results may point you to seek an evaluation, you do not have to. You may display certain behaviors that result in miscommunication or a little frustration, but they do not interfere with your ability to form relationships and hold a job. It’s okay to go about your usual routine and not seek out a diagnosis. But if you find that you are having serious trouble in social situations or certain behaviors make you extremely anxious, reach out to a professional. 

Keep an open mind. A professional may assess you and determine that you are experiencing another form of neurodivergence, like ADHD. A similar diagnosis may shine a better light on the symptoms you are experiencing and offer a better treatment for living a successful, happy life. 

Is There a Treatment for Autism? 

People with autism are not given a one-size-fits-all prescription upon diagnosis. There is no one treatment plan for autism, and there is no “cure.” A mental health professional may suggest therapies or even a prescription that will manage symptoms that occur alongside or due to autism, but there is no “autism drug.” Every case is very different and must be treated as such. 

How to Support The Autistic Community

Maybe you are not autistic, but a friend, family member, or colleague is. There are many ways that you can support the autistic and neurodivergent community. 

Be very clear with your communication. People with autism are less likely to “read between the lines” or infer what you are saying. Do not be passive-aggressive or assume that the person will “catch your drift.” Be clear with your communication. Tell the person what you need from them and your expectations in blunt terms. Communicating in this way may make you a better communicator overall!

Provide accommodations. Noise-canceling headphones, fidget cubes, and kneeling chairs are all tools that a person with autism may use to be more productive at work. Ask teammates or employees how best to accommodate them and provide those accommodations without judgment. Be sure to ask all teammates how to best accommodate them, too! This openness will ultimately create a more productive workplace. 

Stick to a schedule. Whether you have a child with autism or work with an adult with autism, be cognizant of their routine. If you need to change that routine, communicate those changes clearly and early.

Reach out to others in the autistic community. There are so many resources created by and for the autistic community. Don’t be afraid to reach out to occupational therapists, parents of autistic children, or other community members. With the right intentions, patience, and proper accommodations, you can help to create a world that includes and supports people with autism. 

Questions 

  1. I have been called out for being impolite or rude, even though I thought I was saying something totally appropriate. 
    1. True
    2. False
  2. Dates and what happened on specific dates fascinate me. 
    1. True
    2. False
  3. I’m very good at making eye contact and reading body language. 
    1. True
    2. False (1) 
  4. I have specific ways I like to go about my day and there is not much room for change. 
    1. True
    2. False 
  5. I experience anxiety when in big social situations. 
    1. True
    2. False
  6. I’m able to “read between the lines” to figure out what a person really means. 
    1. True
    2. False (1) 
  7. I’ve been told I have a bad habit of interrupting people.
    1. True
    2. False
  8. I have a knack for seeing patterns where other people do not.
    1. True
    2. False
  9. People have told me I sound like a robot or they can’t tell if I’m joking.
    1. True
    2. False
  10. I have a habit of repeating the same words and phrases over and over again.
    1. True
    2. False 
  11. There’s no place I’d rather be than a party with all my friends. 
    1. True 
    2. False (1) 
  12. Without a routine, I can feel very flustered. 
    1. True
    2. False 
  13. When I’m speaking to people, I can see when they get bored or distracted. 
    1. True 
    2. False (1)
  14. People often have to explain jokes to me. 
    1. True
    2. False 
  15. While other people tend to see the big picture, I’m always noticing the small details.
    1. True 
    2. False
  16. When reading a book, I can easily make a mental picture of the characters and setting.
    1. True
    2. False (1) 
  17. I tend to get hyper-fixated on one task or activity and it’s hard to pull away from it. 
    1. True
    2. False 
  18. Sometimes, my reactions to certain smells, tastes, or sounds are very different from the people around me. 
    1. True
    2. False
  19. I have a special talent for remembering phone numbers or long strings of numbers. 
    1. True
    2. False 
  20. I’m able to be spontaneous with relative ease.
    1. True
    2. False (1) 

Results 

Not Likely Autistic 

Score: 1-6

These results show that you likely don’t display a lot of behaviors as those on the autism spectrum. Remember, this is not a diagnostic tool. If you have further questions or want to receive a professional evaluation, reach out to a mental health professional. 

Are These Behaviors Impacting Your Life? 

Score: 7-13

Based on your results, you may want to monitor your behaviors and assess how they impact your life. If you find that your social interactions and need for routine are disrupting your ability to hold a steady job or maintain relationships, you may want to reach out to a mental health professional. A counselor can help direct you toward evaluations, treatments, or tools to help you live your most fulfilling life. 

Reach Out to a Mental Health Professional 

Score: 14-20 

Based on your results, you display some behaviors similar to people on the autism spectrum disorder. This is not an official diagnosis. If you want to learn more, or you find that any of these behaviors negatively impact your life, reach out to a mental health professional. A licensed professional can give you a proper evaluation and possible diagnosis.

Theodore T.

Theodore is a professional psychology educator with over 10 years of experience creating educational content on the internet. PracticalPsychology started as a helpful collection of psychological articles to help other students, which has expanded to a Youtube channel with over 2,000,000 subscribers and an online website with 500+ posts.